Join Andrew Dorman and Lloyd Maphosa as they interview some of the world’s best economic historians and talk about everything economic history. Each episode showcases new and exciting research, as Andrew and Lloyd chat with different experts about their latest publications. We explore a diverse array of subjects that show how the lessons from the past are extremely important for the present, and even more so for the future! All episodes are available here.

This podcast is part of the Centre for Economics, Policy and History (CEPH), the All-Ireland Centre of Excellence in economics, history and policy which combines Trinity College Dublin and Queen’s University Belfast. CEPH is funded by the Higher Education Authority’s North South Research Programme.

 

Episode 1: Why can’t Lloyd and Andrew buy a house? With Ronan Lyons

The Irish housing market seems, at first glance, completely impenetrable. To try to unpick the past and present, Ronan Lyons (Trinity College Dublin) joins Andrew and Lloyd to talk through his latest paper about social housing, and Irish housing more broadly.

Link to paper: https://ceph.ie/article-re/social-housing-and-the-spread-of-population-evidence-from-twentieth-century-ireland/

Listen to the episode: HERE.

 

Episode 2: Why didn’t wages change in London for one hundred years? With Judy Stephenson

You would think that generations of workers in seventeenth and eighteenth century London might want a payrise, yet many were paid a fixed wage across their entire working career. Why was this the case? And what can we learn about labour economics and movements from the craftsmen who built St. Paul’s Cathedral? Andrew and Lloyd chat with Judy Stephenson (University College London) about all things early-modern in this discussion of labour and wages in eighteenth-century Britain.

Link to paper: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-economic-history/article/job-tenure-and-unskilled-workers-before-the-industrial-revolution-st-pauls-cathedral-16721748/E7593739FE3F57B9900E813D7D160175

Listen to the episode: HERE.

 

Episode 3: What is Economic Nationalism? With Marvin Suesse

Nationalism is on the rise, but this is nothing new. What are the economic consequences that we can expect from this? Marvin Suesse (Trinity College Dublin) explains ‘the Nationalist Dilemma’ to Andrew and Lloyd, based on his new book which is available now.

Links to book:

 

Listen to the episode: HERE.

 

Episode 4: Why do rebels rebel? With Gaia Narciso

People take up arms for any number of reasons, but how far back do they go? Is it possible that the Irish Famine prompted participation in the Irish War of Independence? Join Andrew and Lloyd as they sit down with Gaia Narciso (Trinity College Dublin) to discuss long-run impacts and what wind can tell us about your likelihood to join a rebellion.

Link to paper: https://ceph.ie/article-re/the-deep-roots-of-rebellion/

Listen to the episode: HERE.

 

Episode 5: Why is Crypto nothing new? With John Turner and William Quinn

Have you ever wondered why so many people get sucked into novel and volatile investments such as cryptocurrency? John Andrew and Lloyd as they sit down with another double-act, John Turner and William Quinn (both Queen’s University Belfast), authors of Boom and Bust. They discuss bubbles, how they come to pass, and the outcomes (positive and negative) once they burst.

Links to book:

 

Listen to the episode: HERE.

 

Episode 6: What was South Africa’s Long Walk to Economic Freedom? With Johann Fourie

Africa is the cradle of civilisation, yet only recently have scholars acknowledged its importance in modern research. What can we learn about economic history from the African experience? And have you ever wondered what economics has to do with Settlers of Catan? Join Andrew and Lloyd as they talk to Johan Fourie (Stellenbosch University) as they talk about his book ‘Our Long Walk to Economic Freedom’.

Link to book: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/our-long-walk-to-economic-freedom/0985F9390A3B26B40DE0AC6BC1111414

Listen to the episode: HERE.